Saturday Snapshots– How often does a Yucca plant bloom?

July 7, 2012 at 5:22 pm 27 comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our yucca plant sent up a spike about a week ago. This week the blossoms opened a little at a time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A close-up shot of the blooms

This plant is one of 49 species and 24 subspecies that grow in North America to South America. Ours appears to be yucca filamentosa.  Our yucca blooms once every few years and so we wait for it to bloom and watch its progress.

But how often it blooms  may depend on the species of this slow-growing plant, as noted on ehow site:

Not all species of yucca bloom with similar regularity or visual prominence. As these plants are slow-growing, some take considerable time to mature to an age that produces flowers. Once a plant does bloom, expect blooms to return again the subsequent years at the same time of year.

 I’ll make a note on the calendar this year so the next time it blooms I’ll know just how often we can expect this plant to bloom. It just may be time to start a gardening notebook. Has anyone else kept one?
Saturday Snapshots hosted by At Home With Books. Go on over and post a photo you or a family member has taken. Remember to keep it respectable.
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Entry filed under: Gardening, Nature, photography. Tags: , , , .

O Canada, we stand on guard for you Five Flowers for Your Summer Garden

27 Comments Add your own

  • 1. lemon123  |  July 7, 2012 at 5:44 pm

    The blooms are very healthy and pretty. It’s tall like a gladiola.

    Reply
    • 2. storygal  |  July 7, 2012 at 6:04 pm

      That is it. I think the blossoms are beautiful. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
      • 3. lemon123  |  July 21, 2012 at 8:00 pm

        You’re welcome.

  • 4. Alyce (@AtHomeWithBooks)  |  July 7, 2012 at 6:51 pm

    That’s so pretty! I haven’t kept a gardening notebook before, but it sounds like a good idea.

    Reply
    • 5. storygal  |  July 7, 2012 at 7:15 pm

      Think I’ll have to dedicate a notebook to doing this. I’ve thought about it before. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  • 6. cherylmahoney  |  July 7, 2012 at 6:56 pm

    How lovely! Sometimes the rare-bloomers have the best flowers. It’s like they put all the effort into a once-a-year event.

    Reply
  • 7. Kailana  |  July 7, 2012 at 9:01 pm

    Pretty flowers!!

    Reply
    • 8. storygal  |  July 7, 2012 at 11:09 pm

      Thanks, Kailana. I think so too.

      Reply
  • 9. Leslie  |  July 7, 2012 at 10:08 pm

    That’s amazing. I didn’t know they bloomed. Does it stay outside or come in for the winter? I have a house plant variety that is called a corn plant. I’ve never seen it bloom.

    I don’t keep a garden notebook because I have a garden blog that I refer back to. Unfortunately I’ve been neglecting it this year so it’s not up to date.

    Reply
    • 10. storygal  |  July 7, 2012 at 10:17 pm

      This plant stays outside, Leslie. The roots are very deep and tough. Neighbours tried to get their out of their flowerbed and it was quite a job. We have a lot of sand in our soil and so the water drains away. Maybe a good thing for the yucca.

      Where’s your garden blog posted? Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  • 11. Bev@My Reader's Block  |  July 8, 2012 at 1:43 am

    Oh, how pretty! The blooms remind me of the Lily of the Valley.

    Here’s my Snapshot.

    Reply
    • 12. storygal  |  July 8, 2012 at 11:41 am

      That’s an interesting comparison since Lily of the Valley is much smaller. I suppose their blooms to look a little alike, apart from their size. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  • 13. Christine Harding  |  July 8, 2012 at 8:36 am

    That is spectacular. For some reason I thought they don’t flower very often, especially here in England. Are they difficult to grow? My Snapshots are at http://chriscross-thebooktrunk.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/parisian-pictures-take-two.html

    Reply
    • 14. storygal  |  July 8, 2012 at 11:18 am

      The plant was in our garden when we moved here and I decided it could stay, 😉 We have sandy soil and so I suppose the plant likes its spot, and it’s in the cactus family like the aloe. I don’t have to do a thing to make it grow. Probably likes our temperate climate. I’ll have to mark it in my new notebook that it bloomed this year and watch it. Not every year, maybe every other year.

      Reply
  • 15. Louise  |  July 8, 2012 at 12:32 pm

    The blooms are lovely.

    Reply
  • 16. Kaye  |  July 8, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    Those are pretty. I didn’t realize that they only bloom every few years.

    Reply
  • 17. Diane@BibliophilebytheSea  |  July 9, 2012 at 1:38 am

    I love the yucca plants, but they are so had to take out of the ground afterward…LOL

    Reply
    • 18. storygal  |  July 9, 2012 at 8:48 pm

      That’s why the plant will stay. In fact there are other younger yuccas attached at the base. We could have more flower stems in time. Alas the flowers are already starting to fade.

      Reply
  • 19. trish  |  July 9, 2012 at 1:14 pm

    Those are some impressive blooms! It acts a lot like an orchid I have that blooms once a year but takes ffoorrreevveerr to get there.

    Reply
    • 20. storygal  |  July 9, 2012 at 8:49 pm

      And like my aloe, packed in a planter in the house. It sent up a stalk in the winter and we had some blooms on that too.

      Reply
  • 21. pebbles  |  July 16, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    Mine took 6 year’s to bloom after it was moved,they are the same as your’s.But one I transplanted ,split from the other took only 2 yrs to produce

    Reply
    • 22. storygal  |  July 16, 2013 at 12:33 pm

      Thanks for stopping by my blog and commenting. We have new blooms this week. Perhaps I’ll get another pic posted of those. Two years since the last bloom, I think.

      Reply
  • 23. Liz  |  July 22, 2013 at 2:04 am

    Just read this post. My Yucca bloomed in 2012 as well – it was very tall and majestic!! It took about 5 years from the time I transplanted it until it flowered. This year the Yucca looks very sad and has not done anything – the leaves are even dull! I constantly have “baby” Yuccas growing where I first planted the Yucca. They are indeed very difficult to get rid of – the roots grow deep!

    Reply
    • 24. storygal  |  July 22, 2013 at 12:21 pm

      Hello Liz,
      I don’t know the solution to that problem, sorry. Too much water?
      Our yuccas sent up two stalks with flowers this summer and both bloomed. Thanks for stopping by and commenting on my blog.

      Reply
      • 25. Liz  |  July 23, 2013 at 1:12 pm

        My Yucca does get plenty of water as it is located by our downspout! I will wait and see what happens next year 🙂

  • 26. Bonnie Wilson  |  June 22, 2017 at 10:39 am

    my yucca bloomed after years and years..only to have the flowers fall off within days????????

    Reply
    • 27. storygal  |  June 22, 2017 at 6:52 pm

      That could be. The blossoms are pretty when the plant flowers, but they don’t last long. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Reply

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