Posts filed under ‘entertainment’

Kawartha Settlers’ Village

 

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Search page given to our granddaughters on paying the entry fee

On one of our days away, we went with our host family to Kawartha Settlers’ Village that’s located just outside of Bobcaygeon.

According to the tour booklet for the village,

In 1990, the dream of establishing a museum to preserve history and the development of the area became a reality when a small group of people calling themselves the Kawartha Region Arts and Heritage Society convinced the village of Bobcaygeon to lease them the land to establish the Kawartha Settlers’ Village.

 

Follow along with me on our tour of some of the buildings. Here’s the map that’s in the program booklet. It’s an easy walk through for visitors of any age.

http://www.settlersvillage.org/tour-the-village

The receptionist at the main building gave each of our granddaughters a card showing pictures of things to look for in the village and a crayon to mark off items as they found them. It became a game for all of us to help them find the items.

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Quilters meet regularly in the Wray House to learn their craft. There were many interesting quilts hanging in this home.

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A rather colourful and picturesque quilt

 

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A child’s room in another home

Our granddaughters interest was limited in some areas due to their ages of 6 and 8, although the adults could have spent more time. Another time perhaps. The girls did enjoy wandering through the village and checking off the items on their card. They awaited a prize at the end.

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The firehall housed an old engine and hoses and hats. The building is a replica of the original Bobcaycaygeon Fire Company station.

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The Fairbairn Church

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a wooden offering plate

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Inside the classroom, one modelling the dunce hat and one drawing on the chalkboard

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What’s inside this desk?

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Outside the trapper’s cabin

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A warm rug inside.

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If the printer needed a graphic for a newspaper or flyers, he’d have these images…

 

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or even these images. Not simply drawings but carvings that someone had made.

 

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And a bit of fun at the end of the Kawartha Settlers’ Village.

The girls showed their cards at the admission centre and got their little prize and could keep the cards to remember the visit.

If you’re in the area this summer, go to the village and take the self-guided tour. It was well worth the time and price of admission, which was quite reasonable.

July 28, 2018 at 11:56 am Leave a comment

Holidays in the Kawarthas, Day One

 

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Buckhorn docking

It was the time of year again to visit our daughter and son-in-law and two granddaughters at their trailer in the Kawarthas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to set aside daily duties and get away.

After slow-moving traffic on the 401, it was good to get on the less congested 407 for a good chunk of the journey. That driving is easier, especially on a clear sunny day until our GPS, Matilda, got caught up with trying to redirect us on what was once country road. Guess it’s past time to update her maps. Oops.

Back roads and then the 115 highway to Peterborough were similarly unremarkable that day and finally at 12: 20, give or take a few minutes, we arrived at Grandview Resort, where our daughter Laura was waiting in the golf cart with her two girls. We drove through to the trailer site and parked then hugged and greeted our family members.

In the heat of the day, it was good to relax a bit and have some lunch. I’d asked for a boat ride and the plan for it was already in motion. We headed for the launch area and assembled ourselves, life jackets and all, for Buckhorn, where we’d go for ice cream, a favourite trip for the girls.

 

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Heading for the bridge to cross, Laura waiting for us

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The Shaw’s new favourite ice-cream shop in Buckhorn, on the main street

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So hard to choose from so many flavours. We enjoyed the taste.

The ice cream shop offered a bucket of chalk and opportunity to draw on the boardwalk to the sidewalk.

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Down the road a bit we saw a giant moose—not a real one, of course— where the girls posed.

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 Posing for fun

Walking further, we came upon a small beach area, where the girls cooled off in the  shallow water. It sounds as though this area is designated for a small park sometime in the future.

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Down the road a bit sat a building that might have been a church or school at one time. It was now a curiosity shop with some neat crafts and gift items in it. Loved these owls. Had I brought some money, one of these little owls might be in my garden today.

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We headed back toward the lock area where we’d cross to the place their boat was parked.

 

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On our way back we saw that more boaters had their boats tied to the dock and had pitched a picnic shelter.

That evening, I accompanied Dave and the girls to the family swimming pool on the grounds. The water was a bit cool, but the six-year-old got in anyway and began to play in the water and swim. Eventually her Dad got in too. The eight-year-old, deciding the water was a bit too cold for her, got permission to go to the playground situated close by.

 

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Stopping at the playground for a short time, I had opportunity to see how well the girls handled the monkey bars. Then it was back to the trailer to get the girls ready for bed.

Holidays had only begun, and we were off to a good start.

 

 

 

Photos on this blog are copyright of C. and L. Wilker unless otherwise noted. Please ask permission if you wish to use one.

July 23, 2018 at 3:30 pm Leave a comment

Blog continues…

My blog continues  over at www.carolynwilker.ca. Look for Storygal’s Blog. Come on over and see my posts in my new site. Here’s a few of my recent posts:

http://www.carolynwilker.ca/blog/2016/08/21/rcmp-musical-ride.shtml

http://www.carolynwilker.ca/blog/2016/09/11/going-home-to-the-fair.shtml

 

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September 13, 2016 at 12:28 pm Leave a comment

This is Christmas

Another of my favourite performers. Enjoy and Merry Christmas.

 

 

December 25, 2015 at 12:36 pm Leave a comment

A fine Christmas concert

 

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Yesterday afternoon my husband and I, and our friend, Judy, attended a choir concert at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church in Kitchener with Inshallah (a group numbering 130)and the St Peter’s choir and all the musicians involved. The church was filled and so was the front of the church with singers and musicians.

The choirs sang pieces from around the world—England, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, New Zealand, Latin America, Brazil, USA, Korea, Germany and Poland—in English and in other languages. A few selections were: He Came Down, Helpless and Hungry (Paired with What Child is This?), Come Now, O Prince of Peace. We as audience members were invited to join in on traditional carols as well as the refrain of several choir selections.

Senior pastor, Mark Ehlebracht delivered a moving message on who Christmas is intended for and how we often want to set aside the troubles in the world to enjoy a Christmas for children, when really Christmas is for all of us.

As well we heard from Judy Nairn, Executive Director of Hospice Waterloo Region. That organization is recipient of all donations from the concert. Nairn spoke of how the organization provides services to those diagnosed with cancer and their family members. She said people often think of Hospice as the “end of the road” when it’s so much more than that.

Directors for the choirs were Debbie Lou Ludolph (Inshallah) and Peter Nikiforuk (St Peter’s Lutheran Church) with Bradley Moggach on piano, Bill Gastmeier, Ian Sommer and Don Neville on guitar. Playing percussion were Julie Hill, Don Neville and Daniel Corrigan. Kristine Lund of Wilfrid Laurier University  Seminary, played violin and Joshua Ehlebracht and Peter Nikiforuk on organ for carols sung by the congregation. What a joyful sound and a reminder of  God with us in a world that’s not always so welcoming.

We were delighted to hear that portions of this concert will be used for the Christmas Eve broadcast this year and again on Sunday, December 27th at 10 am EST via CTV Southwestern Ontario and will include vignettes and Christmas greetings from around the world.

The last, a favourite—Silent Night— with candles lit and lights turned down, was our closing carol before the postlude.

Perhaps you’ll tune in for one of those broadcasts and enjoy the music as much as we did.

 

December 14, 2015 at 1:35 pm Leave a comment

Through the Locks by Boat

Back to our holidays and something we did for the first time. My husband and I had watched from the sidelines as boats went through locks in Peterborough and in Midland area, but this time we experienced it while riding in our daughter and son-in-law’s boat.

We had a clear day and my daughter packed a picnic lunch, water and juice boxes, and extra snacks for the children. We set off from the trailer and got settled in the boat, life jackets and all.

DSCF9150 We saw a bird on one of the other boats as we pulled out.DSCF9152Here’s a better shot.  It’s a stork.

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DSCF9155Leaving the park behind, I noticed how the boat makes a trail that looks like a dolphin’s or whale’s  forked tail. It’s slightly cooler out here on the water with a bit of breeze.

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From http://www.boatingontario.ca/Articles/tabid/71/ID/42/PageID/61/The-Trent-Severn-Waterway-Trenton-to-Bobcaygeon.aspx

Buckhorn – Lock 31 is a very busy spot in July and August, so keep a good watch for downbound traffic as you turn into the lock.

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Waiting at the first lock at Buckhorn for all the boats to be secured. As a boater, our son-in-law is a safe operator.

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Looking up to the top to see how far the water will rise. She already is a  good helper in putting out the bumpers to protect the side of the boat. It was also a very warm day and we’re wearing our sunscreen.

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I cannot remember all the spots and which ones they were. We went through Buckhorn Lock, 31, then Lovesick Lock, which was #30 on the way to Bobcaygeon.

LoveSick Lock: There’s a story to that name.

Lock 30 – Lovesick, tucked in on Millage Island, is hard to spot, so look for the red day beacon on Wolf Island to guide you in and around the green buoy to the lock.There is no road access to the lock, so the quiet and beautiful surroundings make this the place to be in this area. In peak season, plan on arriving early and grabbing a space on the lower lock wall.You’ll also find space on the upper walls in a park-like setting.

http://www.boatingontario.ca/Articles/tabid/71/ID/42/PageID/61/The-Trent-Severn-Waterway-Trenton-to-Bobcaygeon.aspx

After LoveSick Lock, we passed many rocky islands, with the wind in our face and the sun overhead, then through Burleigh Lock

By this time we’d gone through two locks, had a picnic at Lovesick Lock and then one more lock

DSCF9166 Some grand boats on this stretch of water. Think we’re back at Buckhorn.

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Many interesting cottages and homes along the lake

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DSCF9170Getting to be good boaters

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Canoe pulled up to that island. Is there even a cottage there?

DSCF9209 The open water, the sky. The sun was hot but we’re cooler on the water. Still a sunburn at the end of the day in spite of  applying more sunscreen part way through our outing.

DSCF9213 Along the lake shore on our way back to the resort. It’s been a good day and the girls are tired.

DSCF9172 A nearly deserted island?

DSCF9200 On our way back to the resort, and the girls slept part of the last stretch. It was a good day.

Photos copyright C Wilker unless otherwise noted

August 26, 2015 at 10:56 am 4 comments

Canadian Canoe Museum –Part 2

 

As mentioned in Part 1 of Canadian Canoe Museum, there’s so much to see and learn here that one could spend most of a day here.

 

 

DSCF7608 This sign says, in part,

Missionaries, beginning with the Jesuits in the 1600s, regularly used canoes to reach the remote parts of Canada… they cheerfully accepted the rigours of life on the trail.

 

 

DSCF7609A canoe that folds. Imagine that! I suppose it would help where there is limited storage space.

 

 

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Here’s a closed-in canoe, somewhat like a kayak in appearance. See the wooden seat, like a lawn chair,  and the attached oar. Perhaps only for leisure and not a working canoe.

 

 

 

DSCF7611 A canoe, with not one, but two sails. The sails would catch the wind and it looks like they could be moved to do just that.

 

DSCF7612A courting canoe, with cushy pillows for the pair, and music too. See the on-board Victrola?

 

 

DSCF7613A close-up of the music machine. I think the courting couple would want to go out on calm waters, otherwise the record player and cushions could get wet. Imagine the courting couple out on the water of a calm lake and they’re listening to their favourite music as they paddle.

 

 

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In another canoe, a similar type of record player, without the amplifier. We had records like this in a black box gramophone.

 

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Look at this sleek canoe with the cushioned seat. Pretty classy.

 

 

DSCF7618 And the very last canoe we saw named for someone special– it’s a good name.

 

There we are at the end of the canoe museum.  I stopped at the gift shop to look around. I came home with two books, one to read to my granddaughters and one about storytelling. Love the children’s picture book story, One Dog Canoe, by Mary Casanova, illustrated by Ard Hoyt. I also discovered that one story in the book, Mugged by a Moose, ed.  Matt Jackson, was written by a Waterloo Region author, Leslie Bamford, whom I happen to know.

 

September 2, 2014 at 12:49 am Leave a comment

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