Through the Locks by Boat

Back to our holidays and something we did for the first time. My husband and I had watched from the sidelines as boats went through locks in Peterborough and in Midland area, but this time we experienced it while riding in our daughter and son-in-law’s boat.

We had a clear day and my daughter packed a picnic lunch, water and juice boxes, and extra snacks for the children. We set off from the trailer and got settled in the boat, life jackets and all.

DSCF9150 We saw a bird on one of the other boats as we pulled out.DSCF9152Here’s a better shot.  It’s a stork.

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DSCF9155Leaving the park behind, I noticed how the boat makes a trail that looks like a dolphin’s or whale’s  forked tail. It’s slightly cooler out here on the water with a bit of breeze.

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From http://www.boatingontario.ca/Articles/tabid/71/ID/42/PageID/61/The-Trent-Severn-Waterway-Trenton-to-Bobcaygeon.aspx

Buckhorn – Lock 31 is a very busy spot in July and August, so keep a good watch for downbound traffic as you turn into the lock.

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Waiting at the first lock at Buckhorn for all the boats to be secured. As a boater, our son-in-law is a safe operator.

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Looking up to the top to see how far the water will rise. She already is a  good helper in putting out the bumpers to protect the side of the boat. It was also a very warm day and we’re wearing our sunscreen.

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I cannot remember all the spots and which ones they were. We went through Buckhorn Lock, 31, then Lovesick Lock, which was #30 on the way to Bobcaygeon.

LoveSick Lock: There’s a story to that name.

Lock 30 – Lovesick, tucked in on Millage Island, is hard to spot, so look for the red day beacon on Wolf Island to guide you in and around the green buoy to the lock.There is no road access to the lock, so the quiet and beautiful surroundings make this the place to be in this area. In peak season, plan on arriving early and grabbing a space on the lower lock wall.You’ll also find space on the upper walls in a park-like setting.

http://www.boatingontario.ca/Articles/tabid/71/ID/42/PageID/61/The-Trent-Severn-Waterway-Trenton-to-Bobcaygeon.aspx

After LoveSick Lock, we passed many rocky islands, with the wind in our face and the sun overhead, then through Burleigh Lock

By this time we’d gone through two locks, had a picnic at Lovesick Lock and then one more lock

DSCF9166 Some grand boats on this stretch of water. Think we’re back at Buckhorn.

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Many interesting cottages and homes along the lake

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DSCF9170Getting to be good boaters

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Canoe pulled up to that island. Is there even a cottage there?

DSCF9209 The open water, the sky. The sun was hot but we’re cooler on the water. Still a sunburn at the end of the day in spite of  applying more sunscreen part way through our outing.

DSCF9213 Along the lake shore on our way back to the resort. It’s been a good day and the girls are tired.

DSCF9172 A nearly deserted island?

DSCF9200 On our way back to the resort, and the girls slept part of the last stretch. It was a good day.

Photos copyright C Wilker unless otherwise noted

August 26, 2015 at 10:56 am 2 comments

Church signs: Fed up!?

Some churches post the title of an upcoming sermon on their outdoor signs. The titles can be entertaining or serious, but they often make me think of what that sermon will address. Good food for thought as I drive through the city. I saw one near the expressway in Waterloo recently on my way back from a networking breakfast. It read: Fed Up. I don’t remember if the sign had an exclamation mark or a question mark at the end, but right away I thought of a quirky twist to it, given the new election signs springing up around us.

Yes, we’re going to have an election, and campaigning is underway which means parliament is closed down until the question is decided who will lead our political parties and win the constituencies.

If there’s a question mark at the end (Fed Up?), one might ask ‘fed up with what?’ Might the pastor be asking if we’re ready for new leadership? Did it mean in Ottawa, Waterloo, or in that church’s riding? I kind of suspect it meant up top, in Ottawa.

Do we really need such a long campaign for political leaders to put-downs at each other? No one is right all the time, and it is a free country, at least it was the last time I checked. We have a secret ballot and no one is standing over us pressuring us to vote in a particular way.

What I want is someone in the community who will work hard for us in Ottawa, to handle things like the environment that seriously needs our stewardship—as in some European and North American cities who want to leave a better world for the next generation, and so would I—and food for children who go to school hungry. There are more issues, but those come up top most for me. Longer contemplation will produce a longer list.

I want someone who will be respectful of the people he or she serves in the constituency, including our aboriginal neighbours, and likewise to each other in the House of Parliament. And perhaps that will show up on the campaign trail what kind of person a candidate is. I want someone who can work with other parties, together, on those really important issues our country needs to deal with.

Of course they’re human; of course they want to win for their party. I feel that we need some new leadership there, but maybe not to have everyone as a newbie, for then we’d be ‘reinventing the wheel.’

Wait a moment! Did the sign mean leadership in their church? Many of us are struggling within our respective houses of worship with our shrinking congregations and changing society. There’s plenty of work to do there too.

I really wish I had known what the pastor meant. Maybe, since I was unavailable to attend that service, the pastor will read this and write to let me know. I’d like that.

Despite all this debate on campaigning, remember our rights and freedoms, the secret ballot and how we have some say in our government. Remember how women such as Nellie McClung and others, early in the 20th century, fought hard for women to have the right to vote. Go and vote on October 19th (or in advance polls). Have your say or don’t complain afterwards. You have many days to decide on your candidate. Make it count.

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The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada offers election resources to help you make your best decision. Go here to read them.

August 18, 2015 at 6:47 pm Leave a comment

One more post for Lang Village

The day at Lang Pioneer Village included a lot of stops. Our next one was the cider mill where people brought apples to be sorted, pressed and made into cider. The girls know about apple picking and they’ve tasted sweet apple cider, but this was interesting.

 

 

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DSCF9137We saw a big apple peeler and lots of barrels

 

DSCF9138We walked through an old barn where many piece of equipment were on display. It was a good place to stop and sit for a few minutes.

 

DSCF9140And a wagon without a horse. The girls climbed  up and had their picture taken.

 

DSCF9142We walked down the lane and across the bridge to reach the flour mill

 

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Here we are inside the mill with the guide showing us how the wheat is ground into flour. I was impressed how the young man there showed the girls the process on a level they could understand. He talked about and showed how the flour was ground, what flour was more valuable, and about all the equipment and what it did. We went up to the top floor of this large stone structure, looked at all the hoppers and tools, and looked out the window at the water below, then back down all those stairs and outdoors again.

We enjoyed the day and the girls were very interested in many aspects of this place. I’m sure we’ll be back again another year.

Thank you so much to all the guides and volunteers for telling us about the village and the people who lived in these places and worked at these jobs. Thank you for taking special interest in the way children understand might view the place and time. You made it a special day for them and us.

 

August 13, 2015 at 1:20 pm Leave a comment

Continuing our tour of Lang Pioneer Village

We chose the grassy area out front of the visitor’s centre where there were both trees and picnic tables where we’d eat our lunch. My daughter and husband went to the car to collect our picnic items and we spread out a blanket for anyone to sit in the sun who chose to. The day was a bit cool.

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I must share a humorous incident here. My husband set his sandwich out on the picnic table, ready to eat it and then remembered something in the car that he needed. Before he reached the picnic table again, a bold seagull landed on the table, next to the sandwich, and had the bag in its mouth. My daughter suspecting what might happen was first on her feet and ran and grabbed the sandwich bag from the bird’s mouth just as he began to lift off. What a sandwich rescue! My husband got to have his sandwich after all. Guess that’s a lesson not to leave it to the birds.

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We played a quick game of hide and seek at the end of our lunch and then we were back into the village again for the rest of our tour.

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We looked inside the Milburn House that’s first on the path. The guide there, whose picture we didn’t get, was baking cookies for the hotel which someone would collect in a basket and sell at the hotel.

I learned after posting pictures last year that Sophie, whom we saw at the Keene hotel again this year, is a descendant of the Milburn family who once lived in this home.  Her Mom, Tania, is a fellow editor in our association and who told me this when I posted my links on Facebook.

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Here’s a photo of Sophie (on the right) from our tour last year. The girl on the left is also named Sophie.

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On to the Douro town hall, after passing buildings we’d already looked at. In that hall, people would do their voting in an election, have their public meetings. I wondered about the little cubicles with curtains. I read in the guide book that those were installed so people could secretly mark their ballots in an election. Before that voting was done by an open “show of hands.”

There was also a commemorative plaque to famous people of the area, that included authors Susanna Moodie and Catharine Parr Trail.

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My husband asked that I take a picture of him by this old steam engine and suggested the title be “Two old things.” His title, not mine.

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Inside the Glen Alda Church, the ornate woodwork and the pump organ similar in workings and style to the one we had in our Sunday School room when I first started teaching.

I didn’t understand the meaning of the bowl and ewer in the pastor’s room, but now I do. The circuit preacher would visit four different churches by horseback. There would be fresh water for the pastor to pour into the bowl and wash off some of the travel dust before he conducted worship.

Before the church was built, people met in each others’ homes.

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We were all interested in the Lowry Weaver Shop.

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Interested in the small woven things made here.

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We stood on the lawn and listened to a man playing a harp on the porch adjoining the weavery. It was gentle music and he played well.

Over to the blacksmith’s shop where we watched someone bend iron that had been heated in the forge. We didn’t take pictures there, but the girls watched the hot metal being bent.

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The girls sitting at a desk together in the South Lake School, S. S. #4, drawing with chalk on their slates, while the teacher tells of the discipline used and lessons taught. They wiped the words and drawing off the slate before they left.

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Checking out how things look from the top of the climber. Those steps were more difficult to climb than the playground the girls are used to

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Seeing the chickens

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and the sheep.

I’ll stop here for today. Come back to see the rest in a day or so.

August 7, 2015 at 1:00 pm Leave a comment

Back to holidays–Lang Pioneer Village

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This year when we toured Lang Pioneer Village, we were there with our daughter and her two young children. Seen and experienced from an almost-4 to a nearly-6 year-old’s perspective, we would understandably travel through the village at a different pace than we did a year ago.

We started our tour with the animal pen next to the Milburn House, where pigs were snuffling in their pen and coming to see who was looking in at them.

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Next we went to the Hastie Carpenter Shop where the volunteer said they made things of wood, and especially wheels for the buggies and wagons. Then the tinsmith shop to see what was there.

 

Outside of the Fife cabin (shown above) was  a guide using a single spindle to get her yarn ready for knitting. A fire was going in the pit nearby where she would cook her meal or dye her yarn. We looked inside the cabin. It was quite dark compared to other buildings. The bed was a box on the floor with blankets in it and a fireplace at the end for warmth and cooking. The girls were interested to see how things looked there.
We crossed the road to the Fitzpatrick House where the guide told us about the family gathering in the main room. They would eat there and sit around the table for it was the only heated space in the house. We trudged up the narrow winding steps,  holding on to the handrail, to the upstairs to see where the family slept. Here they had beds and a quilt rack was set against a wall showing a project the mother might be working on. The beds were much different than the girls were used to and I wondered what they were thinking about it.

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See the dried herbs hanging above the fireplace. Those were often the medicines that the parents used to treat illness because the doctor lived a long distance away.

 

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On to the Register where the two young men told us about what they do. They showed us how they printed things, including newspaper, for the businesses in the village. It took a lot longer than with our computers and fast printing presses.

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It would take a long time to produce a newspaper with these pieces of equipment

 

We stopped at the Keene Hotel where a guide told us a little bit about the family who lived there and provided meals and a bed for travellers. We took our own tour of the building, but I did get to say hello to Sophie who gave us our tour last year and served tea and cookies. I thought we might come back for tea and cookies this time, but we didn’t.

 

On to the Menie General Store. It’s a bit like our stores that sell all kinds of things under one roof.

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The girls were interested in the toys on the counter and the little books.

 

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Here’s their Papa talking to one of the guides in the store.

 

DSCF9103Ana thought the lady’s blouse was pretty. Or was it the necklace and the hat she was commenting on? Anyway, there were many pretty things there for a lady or little girl at the time.

 

DSCF9105People gathered outside the Fitzpatrick  house, and we stopped along the way to see what was happening. There was a young woman doing laundry. She invited the girls to give it a try on the washboard. Ana wanted to try it so the guide helped her push up her sleeves so they wouldn’t get wet, and then showed her how to put the soap on the board first…

DSCF9107and then get both hands working on scrubbing a piece of clothing so it would be nice and clean. Different than Mommy and Daddy’s washing machine.

On our way to the car for our picnic lunch they stopped off to see the pigs again and then the Centennial commemoration rock out front.

 

I was impressed with how the guides geared their talks to include our youngsters. Thank you, all.

 

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Off to get our picnic lunch. Taking a break until tomorrow when we’ll continue our tour of the village

August 5, 2015 at 4:29 pm Leave a comment

Maranatha Lutheran Church annual picnic

In an unusual move, our church service was cancelled last Sunday, but for a reason. You see, Maranatha Lutheran church and St. Philip are engaged in a covenant partnership and there are times when we have special events that we invite Maranatha members to worship with us, and times that they have special events to which we are invited. Granted we can attend their worship any time, and they are welcome to do the same.

The picnic time had come around again, and having something to do with creating the bulletins, I made sure their welcome was posted often enough that our members would get to see it–that and the address so everyone could find it.

The day dawned hot and sunny, and we were ready with salad, drinks, picnic plates, napkins and cutlery in our picnic basket. Having never been to one of their picnics, my husband and I didn’t know what to expect. If we had  gone by other events, we might have known, but picnics in a park can be different and I hadn’t seen the sign-up sheet in weeks because we had been away on vacation.

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We arrived to see people putting table cloths on the picnic tables. Leonard Maitland, of Maranatha, was getting out some of the wrapped cloths. I volunteered to help, and we were a team. Ruby and her daughter Wendy were another team and some of the women, including Leonard’s wife, Eugenie, were busy getting the food tables ready..

DSCF9248A member of Maranatha who always has the most wonderful smile.

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And one more, Ubaldo, his wife and Angie.

Some people really dress up for a church picnic.

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The Janssen family, talking about their summer plans

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What do we do while waiting? We visit. Lynette chatting with Carolyn and Don

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Opening of the service. Ubaldo, musician for Maranatha, accompanies us on his accordion.

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Pastor Claudine, at the front, leading worship

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One request for a song was “O Canada.” We can give thanks for our country. Everyone knows this song, including these two children.

After the service, it was time to enjoy the good food, salad first since the chicken was not quite ready. The chicken and hot dishes were worth waiting for. They were yummy, as were the salads.

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The Starlite Steel Band set up and began playing…

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A new addition to the band? He’s traded in his accordion for a steel drum

Then time for more visiting and some dessert.

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Games for big kids and little ones with hula hoops and balls. No ball game today, I guess. It’s pretty hot out there. So glad for the picnic shelter.

Thanks, Maranatha members, for your hospitality and the good food.

August 2, 2015 at 7:43 pm Leave a comment

Toastmasters, even on holidays

I’m a long-standing member of the Energetics Toastmasters of  Kitchener-Waterloo, and as we were planning our holidays in the Grandview Resort in the Kawartha Lakes region, I thought, I wonder what Toastmasters clubs are in the area. A google search brought up three in the area, one at noon in Peterborough, Naturally Speaking Toastmasters, as well as two others. Not being as familiar with the area as one who lives there year round, I decided on Naturally Speaking, a club that meets in the noon hour on Tuesdays.

With the help of Tony Nelson, founder and former member of the Energetics, now a member of Lindsay and District Toastmasters, I contacted Lisa from the Peterborough club and wrote, “I’d like to attend your meeting while I’m in the area. And I’m open to take a meeting role.” Lisa replied with an invitation to speak or take another role that had not yet been filled. I chose the speaking role. Before we left home, I got an email from Brian who was to be my speech evaluator for details on my project and I sent him a message too.

My husband and I drove into Peterborough that Tuesday morning after our initial few days at our daughter and son-in-law’s location. With the help of ‘Matilda,’ our GPS, we got to Charlotte Street, parked and walked the next block to Empress Gardens where the club meets. The seniors were at lunch on our right and the Fireside Lounge to the left where we met Brian Patrick and Susan Johnston who were setting up for the meeting.

 

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At first it seemed as though the meeting would have a small attendance that day, not unlike our own club during the summer, but they trickled in, including Heather Watson, the meeting chairperson for the day. We were early, after all.

The meeting began with welcomes and a greeting on the theme of compost. This club, at least for today, had the speaker slot early, and I was the only one. Julia Ledgard, Grammarian for this meeting, gave us the word of the day, which was ‘dirt.’ With one hour to meet, there’s no time to waste and the meeting went as planned.  Heather introduced me and gave my speech title, No Such Word, and it was time for me to speak.

For those who do not know about Toastmasters, we help each other with our communication and leadership roles through evaluations and the members took time to give me some feedback on my speech, both grow and glow as we like to call them. Grow points to help speakers improve their presentations and glow for the things they did well.

Jay  Schiller, an organic farmer apart from his office job, led the impromptu speaking session as Table Topics Master. His questions were challenging and the speaking time was 2 minutes each.

I thank the members who offered both appreciation and constructive feedback that I will consider the next time I give this speech again, or another similar one. I appreciated the opportunity to visit this warm and welcoming club and would do so again at another such opportunity. Although each club is made up of different individuals, I noticed the same atmosphere that we have in our own club, one that welcomes guests and makes them feel at home, and a true and helpful spirit where we work together to improve our speaking and leadership abilities.

Thank you to the members for making my husband and I feel so welcome. Best wishes to you in your personal and group goals.

DSCF9084A photo of the members and guests that day, with me at far right, in the beautiful Fireside Lounge

 

DSCF9085Susan K. Johnston and Brian Patrick, holding up their banner. They joked that, between them, they represent many years in Toastmasters

 

Then before we headed out for lunch, we walked up the street and took some pictures of the city

 

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DSCF9088I like how the newer buildings blended with the historic in colour in that square.

 

DSCF9089Looking across at Empress Gardens where the Toastmasters meet

 

 

July 25, 2015 at 1:07 pm Leave a comment

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